Top Ten Reading Goals for 2018

Hello my friends,

Today I decided to take part in the Top Ten Tuesdays Link up. I do have a few other ideas for blog posts, but they’re more or less stuck. I lost the notes for one and I haven’t come up with the core element for another. So resolutions it is.

I’m not always much of a New Years resolutions person. I’ve heard enough stories about people giving up on them while it is still January, so sometimes I don’t feel it’s worth doing. That’s probably to my loss because plans have to be made sometime and the beginning of the year isn’t a bad time. So my reading goals:

  1. Read less books. Yes, this sounds like a strange one, but over the last couple of years, I’ve been stuffing my mind with so many stories that they’ve just become a muddle.
  2. ​Read slowly and deliberately. The only reason I’m able to read so many books is because I skim and don’t leave time to absorb them. I don’t take the book in properly. It’s a bad habit I’ve had for many years, and it only got worse with digital books.
  3. Only read when I’m done with other work. This is probably the biggest one. Reading has been the bane of my productivity. It’s been taking up time belonging to other things. It’s the reason I didn’t write this post earlier in the day. The only exceptions to this is reading the Bible and listening to audio books. Depending on the work I’m doing listen can help me along.
  4. Read more blogs. I used to follow quite a few other writers, but I’ve got busy and not kept up with them. It’s more for networking than learning that I need to do this, but I know there’s a lot of things worth reading out there.
  5. Write more reviews. This isn’t a new goal, but it’s a common failing. I know reviews are worth a lot to authors, but it’s so easy not to write them. Yet it’s isn’t difficult to write a very short review for the majority of books. I like giving my whole multi-sided opinion and recommendation for a book, but I don’t always have to. I’ll likely not do review for the books I could care less about, but I should attempt the ones I’m not sure how to feel about. Writing makes the thoughts clearer.
  6. Read a SpecFaith article at least once a week. There’s a lot of good in here.
  7. Read a Creation.com article at least once a week. I can always do with some science or apologetics to keep my mind active. I ought to read the Creation magazine more too.
  8. Finish all the non-fiction books I’m partway through. I can’t skim books on theology or any detailed topic. They require concentration and focus. That also means they take quite a bit longer and I do have a very long non-fiction list. (Thirty-six on Goodreads, not counting books on writing, and there’s more than that on our bookshelves that could be listed.) So this year i am going to focus on getting through at leas the ones I’ve begun. The possible exception is Augustine’s City of God which I got half for the purpose of getting the really long book achievement on Audible. It is fascinating at points, but thirty hours, is thirty hours, and there’s a bit more than that left.
  9. Take notes when I read. I think a lot while reading, but there are so many thoughts and brilliant lines that escape me later. I need to find a way of making notes without constantly distracting from my reading, and then it’ll be good. I do have a journal I’ve used for that purpose already, so that’s not a problem.
  10. Get to the point in my Greek studies that I can read sentences not just one word in ten (and that is only due words we use in English and a few extremely frequent words).

Now all I have to do is remember and do these things and everything will be, well not perfect, but likely better. Remember the signs.

4 Comments

  1. “Only read when I’m done with other work.” is pretty much one I should’ve mentioned for myself as well. I have the awful tendency of simply wanting to curl up with a book and ignore everything else that needs to happen, especially cleaning and other chores connected to that! Books are simply way more fun…

    • Brie Donning

      January 23, 2018 at 9:56 am

      This should probably be a rule for everyone. But it is so hard, especially when you’ve not developed good self control. (And by you I mean people in general, meaning myself.)

      Thanks for dropping by.

      • Brie Donning

        January 24, 2018 at 11:17 am

        I came up with an exception for the no reading until work is done. Reading on lunch break is allowable. But since I work from home and don’t always have anyone to remind me to get back to work, it’s still dangerous.

        • Having self-control like that is hard for every bookworm! Or so I like to believe.
          I’d definitely say reading on lunchbreaks is allowed; it’s a time to relax after all. Maybe set an alarm to help you remind you need to stop reading? 🙂

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