Month: October 2017

Beautiful NaNoWriMo project

It’s time for the Beautiful Books link up with Cait and Skye. This month I get to introduce my NaNoWriMo project. I’m going to be writing A Brigand, No Longer which is the sequel to Girl of the Rumours. I have talked about it before (see this post), but some of my ideas have changed a little and i’m going about it in a different way.

What inspired the idea for your novel, and how long have you had the idea?

Joane being interesting inspired this book. In particular ongoing conflict between Joane and Elind, back in an imaging of the story where Elind was young. And I may have had the idea for about two years. This time last year, I was expecting to begin writing it very soon.

Describe what your novel is about!

Joane and Aydel adjusting to their new situations. Impending war. The groom being captured just before a wedding. Mayhem. Outlaws running wild. Fathers. Sisters. Lots of spoilers.

What is your book’s aesthetic? Use words or photos or whatever you like!

Wide stone streets petering off into dirt paths. Buildings in a mixture of stone, wood and plaster. Plentiful gardens. A river flowing through the town. A dirty tent town for refugees. a tangled forest stretching down from the mountains.

Introduce us to each of your characters!

Joane: Fierce, tomboy, man-hater, intimidating leader, protective, despiser of chiefs, lonely, proud, illiterate.

Aydel: Broken, freedom-lover, comforter, shunned, healer, best sister ever, regretful.

Wil: Noble, cautious, protective, can’t say what he wants, haunted, self-sacrificing, trustworthy.

Ireen: Power-hungry, not a compelling leader, terrifying, clever, perpetual rebel,  hurt.

How do you prepare to write? (Outline, research, stocking up on chocolate, howling, etc.?)

I’ve done a bit of outlining. Still more to do. And I’ve stocked up on chocolate that is to be doled out at mile stones.

What are you most looking forward to about this novel?

Figuring it out. I have some plans, but I’m really just looking forward to seeing where it goes and what new characters pop up.

List 3 things about your novel’s setting.

  1. A lot of the book is in a city.
  2. The city is more open than crowded, and is generally cheerful.
  3. Bright, strong colours are the fashion.

What’s your character’s goal and who (or what) stands in the way?

Joane wants to make the world calm down, but she’s removed herself from her old place of authority and is hopeless in the new situation. Aydel wants her sister happily married, but Arthen has been taken in a raid and Aydel is prohibited from leaving the city.

How does your protagonist change by the end of the novel?

Joane will be less jaded and suspicious. More graceful and capable. Aydel will have found hope again.

What are your book’s themes? How do you want readers to feel when the story is over?

Right now, I feel that a major theme is new beginnings. Submission and trust will come into play as well. I want people to come away feeling lightened and cheered.

 

That’s that, and you can check out the other entries here or here.

Giveaway Winners Announced

Hello everyone,

I finally found enough time to draw the giveaway winners out of Rafflecopter’s magical algorithms (not that it has any). This will just be a short post, but I’ll have something  worth reading up in a day or two.

(I’m excited enough to use a GIF despite having an aversion to them on blogs)

 

Now, here are the winners:

The free critique goes to Keturah Lamb.

Half price on any one of my editing services goes to Faith Blum.

The ebook of The Five Unnecessaries was won by Sarah Taleweaver.

The ebook of the Wander’s Daughter goes to Erika Mathews.

 

I will be contacting all the winners and for everyone else, I still recommend the books and my editing services.

Why You Should Read The Wanderer’s Daughter – Review

The Wanderer’s Daughter is the first book in the Georgie Tanner Series by Justyn Walker. It’s hilarious and you really should read it.

The book is middle-grade and is full of quirkiness, humour, and bit of grossness and comic violence. The stuff kids are supposed to enjoy. I first read it quite a few years back. I know it was in the last ten years, it might have been in the last seven. I still love it today. It was one of the first fantasy books I read outside of Narnia and the second book is one of my favourite allegories ever.

The characters are brilliant. Georgie Tanner is an orphan and a misfit. Her best friend (and only, but who’s counting) Thomas Finnigan isn’t an orphan (though he might as well be for the attention his parents give him), but he is also a misfit and not very brave. And when I say misfit I mean Georgie has been expelled from many schools (she’s currently at St. Mary’s School for Very Difficult Children), and trouble just is drawn to her. She can’t help it. And Thomas gets his lunch stolen everyday. And then they meet and quickly fall through a puddle into the magical land of Allegoria.

Not everything about Allegoria is nice though. They still have to go to school and as neither Georgie nor Thomas know anything about acting like the princess and knight they’re supposed to be, that does not go well. There’s also people being killed in the forest, impending doom, and suspicious characters.

There are certain aspects in common between all books in the series. They always attend school (it’s peasant school where they learn to rake dung in Book 2). There is always a game of Combat Croquet which is a lethal sport with golden armadillos for balls. And there are always monsters and at least on nasty member of the Royal family (and sometimes they’re one and the same).

There’s also a contrary magical book that only opens to riddles, has a time limit and tries to bite off Thomas’s hand more than once. It can however be quite useful. A bat named Max Mousewing or Agent MM is a recurring character as is Smokey the Terrible (a dragon) and Lydian, the great Magician or Wanderer (the book was originally titled The Magician’s Daughter and I have no idea why it was changed for Kindle). Lydian is also Georgie’s father by adoption.

Other characters include a nutty wizard who makes cockroaches into stools and sandwiches, changes people’s hair colour and usually pretends to be a ghost. He found it inconvenient to be around after giving the Duke of Osterik ostrich legs. He also has secrets.  For example he’s the one person who knows where to find the wizard stone that can defeat the dark lord Morlock. Unfortunately he’s forgotten the riddles that explain where to find the keys to unlock the wizard stone.

Despite the presence of a wizard, a magician and a dark lord, the book doesn’t have a lot of magic. It’s mostly silly fairytale type stuff. Or monsters. Anything kids might think of as monsters appears. Bogie men, pirates, ogres, vampires, trolls, and giants. They’re all very much just monsters though and are mostly scary by ugliness or size. They’re not creepy.

The whole Georgie Tanner series is unapologetically allegorical, but I don’t think it’s preachy or overdone. But then, I’m not sure I’m good at telling when a book is preachy and when it’s subtle. However I’m not sure a book with this amount of silliness could be preachy. It’s just too fun. There’s certainly things that can be learned from the story, but it comes naturally.

Now why do I love these books? I’m not sure I can explain it simply. But inside all the silliness is a tale of learning to become brave, and of accepting your identity. The series is also one of the few that my older brothers read and talked about. I had heard quite a bit, so when the third book was published and they got it from the library, I read it too. And then one of them got book two out to read again, so I read it. Finally I helpfully got the first book out for him and was able to read it. So I read them in reverse order. Twice actually.

The second book, The Ancient Machine is my favourite, so I’ll share its description. It’s rather cruel of me, because all but the first book are near impossible to get outside of Australia. I need to contact Justyn Walker and see if I can get him to put them on Kindle too.

The Ancient Machine

When an accident causes Georgie’s orphanage to be drowned in 10,000 gallons of gluggy, grey gruel, Georgie and Thomas sink through a bottomless puddle of gruel into Allegoria once more. There, Lydian the Great Magician charges them with a quest to find a machine that is ticking down to the end of the world – when an ancient curse will be unleashed upon mankind!

In this funny and daring pursuit, Georgie and Thomas team up with a troupe of traveling daredevils, discover a hidden fortress of forest animals, meet some colorful underground grunks, and have several near-painful encounters with a well-meaning torture master.

 

Giveaway

My editing launch giveaway is still running and The Wanderer’s Daughter is one of the prizes.
The deadline is getting close so make sure you share it around.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Editing Launch and a Giveaway

Hey y’all,

I finally did one of the things I’ve been planning ever since I got this website. I am now offering editing services!

I’ve always been one to notice typos and grammar mistakes and I’ve read so many stories that I have a reasonable idea of how that work. I offer basic proofreading, line editing to really help people improve the flow of their prose, and a critique of the general structure.

I’m pretty sure I will comment on other things while line editing though because I won’t be able to stop doing what i do when beta reading. I considered offering structural edits, but I’m not confident in my abilities with that, so the critique will be my way of moving in that direction.

To celebrate the launch I’m running my first ever giveaway. You have a chance to win yourself a free critique, a 50% discount on any one of my edits, or an eBook.

I’m giving away two favourites books that don’t get enough exposure. The Five Unecessaries by Laura Campbell is dystopian that doesn’t follow the usual conventions. It’s gritty, real, and beautiful. The amount of kissing takes it close to the edge of my comfort level. You can check out my full review here.

The Wanderer’s Daughter is quirky middle grade fantasy by Australian author Justyn Walker. It’s rather allegorical (what else would you expect when it’s in the land of Allegoria), but not heavy handed. The story carries itself fine and is completely hilarious. I’ll put up a review for it during the week.

And here is the giveaway:

a Rafflecopter giveaway

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